Pro Hoops History HOF: Sam Cassell

Sam Cassell

Sam Cassell enjoyed a lengthy career as an NBA point guard, but only after an arduous college basketball journey. At age 20, he began playing junior college ball with San Jacinto College outside Houston. Then, at age 22, he transferred to Florida State. After two successful seasons there, Cassell was finally drafted into the NBA at age 24.

And nearly everywhere he went in the NBA, Cassell catalyzed improvement for his teams.

Selected by the Houston Rockets, the geriatric rookie immediately made a huge impact for the Rockets. No one doubts Hakeem Olajuwon was the primary fuel for the Rockets that won back-to-back titles in 1994 and 1995, but Cassell’s role as backup point guard and big game performer helped pull Houston out of some tough fixes. In the 1994 Finals, Cassell hit a huge three-pointer in the final moments to win Game 3. He finished that game with 15 points on 4-6 shooting. Not bad for a rookie who averaged 7 points in the regular season. In the 1995 Finals, Cassell exploded for 31 points on 12 shots leading Houston to a 2-0 series lead over the Magic.

These huge playoff performances paid dividends for Cassell. By his third season, 1995-96, he was averaging 14.5 points and 5 assists per game off of Houston’s bench. Following that season, however, Cassell was traded to the Phoenix Suns and thus began his wandering days.

Over the next three seasons, Sam played for the Suns, Nets, and Mavericks before finally settling in Milwaukee. Not that he wasn’t productive. Cassell averaged 18 points and 6.5 assists in this span, but no club seemed to truly appreciate what he offered. The Nets were particularly foolish. They made their lone postseason between 1994 and 2002 while improving from 26 to 43 wins in their one full season with Cassell.

With the Bucks, though, Cassell found a home and exploited his talents to the max. His biggest assets, oddly for a point guard, were his abilities to post-up and generate lots of free throws. Milwaukee lacked a power forward or center capable of scoring, so Cassell’s production of 19 points and 7 assists per game while making 87% of his free throws was sorely needed. In 2001, teaming with Glenn Robinson and Ray Allen, Cassell’s Bucks narrowly missed out on the NBA Finals losing to the 76ers in a tough 7-game series.

Ever the wanderer, though, Cassell’s time in Milwaukee finished in 2003. Still, Cassell had a couple of curtain calls left.

The Timberwolves in 2004 enjoyed their best season in franchise history after Cassell’s acquisition. Indeed, it was a career year for Cassell who finally made the All-Star Team and was named to the All-NBA 2nd Team at the tender age of 34. With Kevin Garnett as league MVP and Cassell riding shotgun Minnesota made the Western Conference Finals. An unfortunate back injury to Sam kept the Wolves from mounting a full challenge to the Lakers, though, and they lost the series in six games.

In 2006, after an injury-plagued 2005 season, Cassell helped lift the Los Angeles Clippers from their wretched depths. Yes, the Clippers, a franchise that hadn’t won a playoff series since 1976 as the Buffalo Braves. Cassell’s savvy, leadership, and still potent skills mixed beautifully with another superb power forward (Elton Brand) as the Clippers won 47 games. In the playoffs, Sam’s Clippers advanced to the Western Conference Semi-Finals where they lost to the Suns in seven games. From that point on, Cassell was severely limited by injuries, but managed to snag a final NBA championship with the Boston Celtics in 2008.

With his ebullient energy, pull-up jumpers, fearless forays to the rim, and confidence Cassell improved every team he appeared with. The Rockets, Nets, Bucks, Timberwolves, and Clippers were all demonstrably better with the services of Cassell. Even if those teams’ appreciation for Cassell usually proved very short-lived, that kind of track record is no accident, but proof of his prowess. In a career that was anything but short-lived, you can see that prowess almost from the get-go.

Years Played: 1993 – 2008

Accolades

3x Champion (1993-’94, 2008)
All-NBA 2nd Team (2004)
All-Star (2004

Statistics

NBA Career: (1993-94 through 2007-08)
Peak Career Production: (1997-98 through 2005-06)

Average and Advanced Stats

Stat Career Playoff Peak Peak Rank
Games 993 136 610 34th
PPG 15.7 12.2 18.4 30th
RPG 3.2 2.6 3.6 200th
APG 6.0 4.4 7.0 9th
SPG 1.07 0.77 1.16 54th
BPG 0.16 0.14 0.17 225th
TS% 0.544 0.525 0.547 68th
2PT% 0.477 0.430 0.482 98th
3PT% 0.331 0.363 0.333 142nd
FT% 0.861 0.847 0.866 15th
PER 19.5 15.9 20.9 21st
WS/48 0.141 0.093 0.158 24th
Ortg 110 106 112
Drtg 108 109 108

Aggregate Stats

Stat Career Playoff Peak Peak Rank
Games 993 136 610 34th
Minutes 29812 3539 20731 27th
Points 15635 1656 11229 18th
Rebounds 3221 349 2203 112th
Assists 5939 592 4275 6th
Steals 1058 105 710 33rd
Blocks 163 19 105 212th
2PTs 10529 448 3789 18th
3PTs 672 117 374 102nd
FTs 3567 409 2529 17th
WS 87.5 6.9 68.3 20th

Pro Hoops History HOF: Ricky Pierce

Ricky Pierce

A quick look at Ricky Pierce’s career ledger reveals some underwhelming statistics.

Out of 969 career games, Pierce started just 269 of them. In only two seasons of his 16-year career did he start a majority of games for his teams. Only twice did he play over 30 minutes per game for an entire season. Seems like teams were afraid to use Ricky, right?

Wrong.

Ricky Pierce is one of those great players who backs up arguments for substance over volume and quality over quantity. The swingman was hardly ever a starter, but was always instrumental in the success of his teams. He didn’t play a heavy load of minutes, but produced an instantaneous deluge of points.

The most striking thing about Pierce’s attack was just how much of it came on exquisite jump shots. He could come in off the bench cold and be instantly hot. Vinnie Johnson may have got the nickname, but Pierce was even more of a microwave. Johnson averaged 17.5 points per 36 minutes in his career, Pierce averaged 22.0. Indeed, from 1984 to 1997, Pierce possessed the 14th highest points per 36 minutes average. All of the players ahead of him were full-time starters.

Ricky just came in and knocked down the jumpers flawlessly and he was able to break down defenses off the dribble. Shooting just a shade under 50% for his career from the field, Pierce was also unstoppable at the line. From the charity stripe he nailed 88% of his shots.

His best years came with the Milwaukee Bucks and Seattle SuperSonics. In 1990 with the Bucks, he averaged 23 points per game in just 29 minutes. The next year, split between Milwaukee and Seattle, Pierce averaged 20.5 points in 28 minutes. This made him the first and only player ever to log 20+ points in less than 30 minutes a game in back-to-back seasons. In fact, just Clyde Lovellette has done that during any two seasons. In further fact, just five other players have done that in a single season. And none have done it since Pierce in 1991.

In 1987 and 1990 he was named the NBA’s Sixth Man of the Year. In 1991, he was an all-star.  In 1989, he enjoyed his finest playoff moments against the Atlanta Hawks and the Detroit Pistons. The whole postseason was remarkable, however, one game against Atlanta steals the show. It was Game 3 of the 1st Round and Pierce ignited for 35 points in 32 minutes. He was nearly perfect going 13-for-17 from the field, including 2 of 2 from downtown, and 7-for-7 from the free throw line.

One of the best performances from one of the best scorers to ever play basketball. As usual, though, words can only do so much. Just watch the smooth shooting Pierce score a silky 38 points to truly appreciate his game…

Years Played: 1982 – 1998

Accolades

NBA -
2x Sixth Man of the Year (1987, 1990)
All-Star (1991)

Statistics

NBA Career: 1982-83 through 1997-98
Peak Career Production:
1986-87 through 1992-93

Average and Advanced Stats

Stat Career Playoff Peak Peak Rank
Games 969 97 483 80th
PPG 14.9 14.9 19.7 20th
RPG 2.4 2.4 2.8 222nd
APG 1.9 1.9 2.3 126th
SPG 0.79 0.72 0.95 91st
BPG 0.15 0.21 0.2 195th
TS% 0.573 0.548 0.58 29th
2PT% 0.509 0.476 0.517 51st
3PT% 0.322 0.355 0.321 72nd
FT% 0.875 0.866 0.885 6th
PER 17.7 15.2 19.2 21st
WS/48 0.146 0.085 0.159 21st
Ortg 116 112 117
Drtg 110 116 111

Aggregate Stats

Stat Career Playoff Peak Peak Rank
Games 969 97 483 80th
Minutes 23665 2656 14300 68th
Points 14467 1447 9513 21st
Rebounds 2296 229 1329 169th
Assists 1826 187 1135 96th
Steals 768 70 458 82nd
Blocks 147 20 97 184th
2PTs 5095 499 3377 27th
3PTs 296 33 181 62nd
FTs 3389 350 2216 17th
WS 72.2 4.7 47.5 38th

ProHoopsHistory HOF: Jack Sikma

(KRUI)
(KRUI)

The Seattle SuperSonics made the NBA Finals in back-to-back seasons in 1978 and 1979. The Washington Bullets barely subdued the northwest squad in ’78 with a nail-biting Game 7 victory. However, in 1979, the sonic boom couldn’t be silenced and Seattle washed over the Bullets in a 4-1 series victory. The maturation of guards Gus Williams and Dennis Johnson helped push Seattle over the top against an aging Bullets team. So, too, did the development of Jack Sikma who replaced Marvin Webster as Seattle’s center.

In the 1978 Finals, Sikma was just a rookie and only received 32 minutes a night compared to Webster’s 42. In 1979, Sikma garnered 44 minutes of playing time a game. Predictably, his numbers rose from 14 points, 8 rebounds, and one block a game to 16 points, 15 rebounds, and 3 blocks a game.

Over the next decade, Sikma wouldn’t relinquish that level of play. Through 1988, Sikma would average 17 points and 11 rebounds a game and would appear on seven all-star teams. The Sonics, and later on the Milwaukee Bucks, would make him a cornerstone of their teams.

The Sonics and Bucks made a wise choice considering just how versatile Sikma was. Easily discerned from his rebounding average, Sikma was a powerful force on the boards, particularly on the defensive end. His defensive rebound percentage is the 12th highest in NBA history at 24.8%. That means for every four defensive rebounds available Sikma was gonna grab one of them. That’s insanely high and it meant that opponents often only got one good shot against the Sonics and Bucks when Jack was on the court, since he’d prevent second-chance points off of offensive rebounds.

On the offensive end, Sikma was one of the great centers to put a lofty soft touch on his jumper. Using an unusual overhead shot, Sikma was able to time and again fool defenders with a deceptive pump fake. In the post, that pump fake was coupled with exquisite footwork that would allow Jack to twirl and spin toward to the hoop unimpeded, since his defender was completely out of position.

As his career wound down to an end, Sikma would extend his jumper’s range to the three-point line and beyond. Over the last three seasons of his career, Sikma would connect on 35.6% of this three-point attempts. And over all these years, Jack was hitting the nail on the head when it came to free throws. After starting off with a career-worst 77.7% in his rookie season, he worked his way up to a 92.2% average in 1988 which was good enough to lead the entire NBA.

(Also, don’t discount Sikma’s super passing. He’s 10th all-time amongst centers in assists per game average. The man was an all-around basketball stud.)

Sikma was a huge success during his own playing days, but one suspects that if he happened to come along in the current era of basketball, his talents would have been better utilized. The thing is though, the current era wouldn’t exist in the first place without a pioneer like Jack Sikma. He showed us that a big man can control the glass with authority while also putting on an offensive show with gossamer shooting.

Seasons Played: 1978 – 1991

Accolades

NBA -
Champion (1979)
All-Defensive 2nd Team (1982)
7x All-Star (1979-’85)
All-Rookie 1st Team (1978)

Statistics

NBA - 1107 Games
15.6 PPG, 9.8 RPG, 3.2 APG, 1.0 SPG, 0.9 BPG, 46.4% FG, 32.8% 3PT, 84.9% FT
FT% Leader (1988)

Contemporary NBA Ranks (1978 – 1991)
12th Points, 14th FGs Made
5th FTs Made, 10th FT%,
19th 3PTs Made, 14th 3PT%
3rd Rebounds, 11th RPG
15th Blocks, 26th BPG
19th Steals, 23rd Assists
2nd Games Played, 3rd Minutes Played

Pro Hoops History HOF: Sidney Moncrief

Sidney Moncrief

Sidney Moncrief is one of the great “what-if” players in basketball history. He only played six seasons totally healthy as a starter. He spent one season as a reserve and spent four more oft-injured. When he was on the court, his Milwaukee Bucks never won, let alone appeared in, an NBA Finals. His total career points top out at a shade below 12,000.  As a supposed top-notch defender he never achieved more than 140 steals in a season and finished his career below 1000 total steals.

Despite all that, Sidney Moncrief also happens happens to be one of the great “what he did” players in basketball history because what he did was simply spectacular. His Bucks coach Don Nelson summed up Moncrief as a player who wouldn’t do one thing to achieve victory, he’d do everything.

During his heyday, Sid the Squid averaged 20+ points for five straight seasons. Although 6’3″ tall, he would slide from point guard to shooting guard to small forward in Nelson’s helter skelter small ball lineups. No matter what offensive role he took on, Moncrief would usually garner the opponent’s toughest offensive assignment all night, so long as it wasn’t a power forward or center. He could leave that to Bob Lanier.

It seemed that everything else indeed fell on Sid. He could dunk with authority or smoothly swish a jumper. He was a superb passer. He was a great rebounder for his position and size (twice averaging 6.7 RPG for a season). He nailed his free throws all day, every day with an 83% average for his career. And he got there regularly with five straight seasons of 7+ FT attempts per game.

From 1982 to 1986, Moncrief was twice named Defensive Player of the Year, was a perennial All-Star and All-NBA team member, and his Bucks may not have won, or even appeared in, an NBA Finals, but they were an amazing success nonetheless. From 1980 to 1986, the Bucks captured their division’s regular season crown every year. They always appeared in at least the Eastern Conference Semi-Finals, and three times went to the Eastern Conference Finals.

Ultimately, though, Moncrief’s career never reached its fullest potential. What could have been if his knees had never suffered from chronic injury, we’ll never know. But what he did leaves no doubt that he’s a certified true hall of famer.

Years Played: 1979 – 1991

Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks

Accolades

NBA -
2x Defensive Player of the Year (1983-’84)
All-NBA 1st Team (1983)
4x All-Defensive 1st Team (1983-’86)
4x All-NBA 2nd Team (1982, 1984-’86)
All-Defensive 2nd Team (1982)
5x All-Star (1982-’86)

Statistics

NBA Career (1979-80 through 1990-91)
Peak Career Production
(1980-81 through 1985-86)

Average and Advanced Stats

Stat Career Playoff Peak Peak Rank
Games 767 93 461 37th
PPG 15.6 16 19.8 21st
RPG 4.7 5 5.7 75th
APG 3.6 3.4 4.4 40th
SPG 1.2 1.14 1.45 22nd
BPG 0.3 0.39 0.36 108th
TS% 0.591 0.573 0.595 19th
2PT% 0.513 0.486 0.515 63rd
3PT% 0.284 0.293 0.273 55th
FT% 0.831 0.811 0.832 28th
PER 18.7 15.5 20.1 15th
WS/48 0.187 0.118 0.21 3rd
Ortg 119 115 121
Drtg 105 111 104

Aggregate Stats

Stat Career Playoff Peak Peak Rank
Games 767 93 461 37th
Minutes 23150 3226 16483 8th
Points 11931 1487 9125 12th
Rebounds 3575 469 2630 48th
Assists 2793 317 2043 24th
Steals 924 106 669 14th
Blocks 228 36 166 97th
2PTs 4007 474 3102 24th
3PTs 110 17 51 44th
FTs 3587 488 2768 3rd
WS 90.3 7.9 72 3rd

Pro Hoops History HOF: Oscar Robertson

(Spokeo.com)
(Spokeo.com)

The best way to describe Oscar Robertson’s playing style is inexorable.

Inexorably he would wear down and beat up opposing guards with his sheer size. Standing 6’5″ tall and weighing a good 220 lbs, Oscar was easily the biggest point guard the NBA had yet seen. He was certainly the most physically imposing one too. Other guards simply couldn’t handle the Big O as he backed them down for easy post shots.

Inexorably he tore up the entire opponent, not just his own defender. His passing was pinpoint accurate. Seven times Robertson led the NBA in assists per game. He could rebound with the big boys, too, averaging 10.4 rebounds over his first five seasons. His assists per game over the first five seasons? 10.6. And he was of course delivering 30 points a night.

Yep, the Big O averaged a triple double over the course of his first five seasons.

Inexorably, though, team success was rough to come by for Robertson. He surely had great teammates with the Cincinnati Royals like Jack Twyman, Bob Boozer, Wayne Embry, and Jerry Lucas over the years, but the team never quite coalesced into a serial title contender. By 1968, Robertson led the NBA in PPG and APG in the same season, but the Royals finished 39-43 and out of the playoffs.

Two more losing seasons followed and Oscar seemed doomed to his career ending in a whimper. Luckily for him, though, a trade to Milwaukee in 1970 rejuvenated his career. Playing alongside the towering Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and the quicksilver Bob Dandridge, Oscar finally achieved titanic team success. In Oscar’s first season with the Bucks, Milwaukee finished with a 66-16 regular season record and smoked the postseason. They endured just two losses en route to the title. Another Finals appearance came in 1974, but the Boston Celtics thwarted the Bucks in seven games.

By that point Oscar had inexorably come to the end of the line. He was stomped, beat, and whooped up. There was nothing left in the Big O’s tank. But for so many years he had made opponents feel that kind of exhaustion and desperation. Off the court, Oscar amazingly had an even bigger impact by helping to create vibrant players union and instigating free agency. But that’s a story for another day. For now Oscar’s on-court game is more than enough to seal a place forever in this or any basketball Hall of Fame.

Years Played: 1960 – 1974

Accolades

NBA -
Champion (1971)
MVP (1964)
Rookie of the Year (1961)
9x All-NBA 1st Team (1961-’69)
2x All-NBA 2nd Team (1970-’71)
3x All-Star Game MVP (1961, 1964, 1969)
12x All-Star (1961-’72)

Statistics

NBA - 1040 Games
25.7 PPG, 9.5 APG, 7.5 RPG, 48.5% FG, 83.8% FT
7x APG Leader (1961-’62, 1964-’66, 1968-’69)
2x FT% Leader (1964, 1968), PPG Leader (1968)

Contemporary NBA Ranks (1961 – 1974)
1st Assists, 1st APG
2nd Points, 7th PPG
1st FTs Made, 8th FT%
2nd FGs Made, 15th FG%
15th Rebounds
2nd Games Played, 2nd Minutes Played

Pro Hoops History HOF: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

(Photo by Dick Raphael/NBAE via Getty Images)
(Photo by Dick Raphael/NBAE via Getty Images)

For someone who accomplished so much for so long, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar can rightfully make the claim to being the best player to ever lace up a pair of sneakers. Personally, I’m not in the business of trying to suss out such arguments, but if someone picked Kareem how could you doubt them?

His career ran a remarkable 20 years, which only a handful of players have approached. It took Kareem until his 39th year on this earth, his 18th in the NBA, to finally dip below 20 PPG. The only time he shot below 50% from the field was in his final season. At age 37 he spearheaded the Los Angeles Lakers to the title and captured a Finals MVP in the process.

In his younger days, he teamed with Oscar Robertson and Bob Dandridge to deliver the Milwaukee Bucks a title in 1971. During his six seasons in Wisconsin, Kareem averaged an astounding 30 points, 15 rebounds, 4 assists, and 3.5 blocks a game on his way to three MVP awards.

Even after a trade to the Los Angeles Lakers, which left the Lakers gutted, Kareem kept up the assault. The Lakers “stumbled” to a 40-42 record during this first season (1976), but Jabbar was a one man wrecking crew with 28 points, 17 rebounds, 5 assists and 4 blocks per game that season on his way to yet another MVP. These 1970s years were Kareem at his absolute finest but given the lack of exposure the NBA had in general they aren’t as easily relived on SportsCenter highlight clips.

What clips we do receive are of his days in the 1980s with Showtime. Magic Johnson receives rightful credit for igniting Showtime, but when that fastbreak attack wasn’t humming, Kareem was the go-to safety valve. He wasn’t quite the force he was in the 1970s, but Kareem’s second act in his mid-and-late 30s was better than most men ever dream of in their youthful 20s.

The sheer weight and volume of his numbers have such gravity that we’re reduced to chuckles at its absurdity: 6 MVPs, 19 All-Star Games, 15 All-NBA Teams, the all-time leading scorer in NBA history… He battled Wilt Chamberlain, Wes Unseld, Willis Reed, Dave Cowens, Bill Walton, Bob McAdoo, Bob Lanier, Jack Sikma, Hakeem Olajuwon, Artis Gilmore, Moses Malone, Elvin Hayes, Patrick Ewing, and got the best of all of them at one time or another.

So, if someone indeed comes around arguing for Kareem as the greatest of all-time, the argument is about as dependable and solid as Jabbar’s skyhook.

Years Played: 1969 – 1989

Accolades

NBA -
6x Champion (1971, 1980, 1982, 1985, 1987-’88)
2x Finals MVP (1971, 1985)
6x MVP (1971-’72, 1974, 1976-’77, 1980)
10x All-NBA 1st Team (1971-’74, 1976-’77, 1980-’81, 1984, 1986)
5x All-NBA 2nd Team (1970, 1978-’79, 1983, 1985)
4x All-Defensive 1st Team (1974-’75, 1979-’81)
6x All-Defensive 2nd Team (1970-’71, 1976-’78, 1984)
Rookie of the Year (1970), All-Rookie 1st Team (1970)
19x All-Time All-Star (1970-’77, 1979-’89)

Statistics

NBA - 1560 Games
24.6 PPG, 11.2 RPG, 3.6 APG, 2.6 BPG, 0.9 SPG, 55.9% FG, 72.1% FT
4x BPG Leader (1975-’76, 1979-’80), 2x PPG Leader (1971-’72)
FG% Leader (1977), RPG Leader (1976)

Contemporary NBA Ranks (1969-70 through 1988-89 season)
1st Points, 7th PPG
1st FGs Made, 6th FG%
2nd FTs Made
1st Rebounds, 9th RPG
1st Blocks*, 3rd BPG*
8th Assists, 14th Steals*
1st Games Played, 1st Minutes Played

*Stats not kept until the 1973-74 season

Pro Hoops History HOF: Bob Lanier

Bob Lanier

A stout 6’11” and 250 lbs., Bob Lanier was among the NBA’s best centers for over a decade. However, his excellence eludes the masses. Most of his career was spent with the Detroit Pistons where there was some modest success, but more often frustration. A late career move to Milwaukee gave Lanier his best and most sustained taste of success, but small market Milwaukee is hardly given its proper due for being a 1980s powerhouse.

Lanier himself is denied the recognition of being a powerhouse in the pivot.

From 1972 to 1979, the sterling left-handed center delivered 24 points, 12.5 rebounds, 3.5 assists, and 2 blocks a night on 51% shooting from the field and 78% shooting from the line. Although the Pistons possessed a winning record during just three of Lanier’s nine full seasons there, his stats weren’t of the empty variety. Every single one of his rolling dreadnought hook shots was necessary to keep the Pistons at least mediocre. He controlled the boards with a single-minded ferocity. His defense was so determined that Kareem Abdul-Jabbar complained about it in the comedy classic Airplane!

If Jabbar was tired of carrying Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes, Lanier by 1980 was tired of carrying the moribund Pistons 82 games a year. His blockbuster trade to the Bucks cemented the fortunes of a burgeoning title-contender. These Bucks squads consistently won over 50 games every year, captured the Central Division title every year, and reached the Eastern Conference Finals twice by the time Lanier retired in 1984.

Bob’s career was one of the best but remained slightly unfulfilled due to his tendency to accrue nagging injuries. Over the first half of his career, Lanier played in over 70 games  five times. Over the last half, he managed only two seasons over 70 games. Even more unfulfilling is the stark realization that Lanier for all his offensive abilities and defensive terror never made an All-NBA or All-Defensive team. Nonetheless, his eight all-star appearances serve as a reminder that he was indeed the cream of the crop.

Years Played: 1970 – 1984

Accolades

NBA -
8x All-Star (1972-’75, 1977-’79, 1982)
All-Star Game MVP (1974)
All-Rookie Team (1971)

Statistics

NBA Career (1970-71 through 1983-84)
Peak Career Production
(1971-72 through 1979-80)

Average and Advanced Stats

Stat Career Playoff Peak Peak Rank
Games 959 67 625 26th
PPG 20.1 18.6 23.4 6th
RPG 10.1 9.6 12.1 9th
APG 3.1 3.5 3.5 58th
SPG 1.09 0.93 1.16 60th
BPG 1.53 1.48 1.91 9th
TS% 0.559 0.573 0.558 27th
2PT% 0.515 0.532 0.514 15th
3PT% 0.154 0.000 0.167
FT% 0.767 0.768 0.781 95th
PER 21.7 20.8 23.0 3rd
WS/48 0.175 0.175 0.184 8th
Ortg 111 111 112
Drtg 98 102 97

Aggregate Stats

Stat Career Playoff Peak Peak Rank
Games 959 67 625 26th
Minutes 32103 2361 23362 12th
Points 19248 1244 14615 4th
Rebounds 9698 645 7577 6th
Assists 3007 235 2172 30th
Steals 777 62 540 49th
Blocks 1100 99 888 7th
2PTs 7759 508 5918 4th
3PTs 2 0 1
FTs 3724 228 2776 6th
WS 117.1 8.6 89.6 2nd

Drtg, Steals, SPG, Blocks, and BPG not kept until 1973-74
Ortg not kept until 1977-78
3PTs, 3PT% not kept until 1979-80