The Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams: 1974-75 Season

Top: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar; Bottom (l to r): Bob Dandridge, Randy Smith, Earl Monroe, and Rudy Tomjanovich
Top: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar; Bottom (l to r): Bob Dandridge, Randy Smith, Earl Monroe, and Rudy Tomjanovich

Ed. Note: Prior to the 1988-89 season, the NBA only had All-NBA 1st and All-NBA 2nd Teams. To fill in that historical award gap, the crack Pro Hoops History committee of one has gone back and created the Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams.

Kicking off the 1975 All-NBA 3rd Team is the super athlete Randy Smith. The Buffalo Braves point guard was the 104th(!) pick of the 1971 draft and now here he is averaging 18 PPG and 6.5 APG for a 49-win ball club. Smith contributed to the Braves very good year with a knack for making buoyant jump shots, making daring steals, and crashing the boards superbly for his position with 4.2 RPG.

Randy’s teammate Bob McAdoo took home MVP honors for the NBA and knocked Kareem Abdul-Jabbar off the All-NBA 1st Team. So here is Kareem on the 3rd team squad after a relatively underwhelming season. Well, underwhelming for him. Kareem still averaged 30 points, 14 rebounds, 4 assists and 3 blocks per game on a career-low 51% shooting. He missed 17 games and the Bucks straggled to 38 wins in his absence. Picking up the slack as best he could was Bob Dandridge. The Bucks forward averaged 20 points and 7 rebounds per game and was Milwaukee’s most persistent performer all year. More troublesome for Milwaukee was that Jabbar was unhappy and grumbling for a change of scenery. It would come soon enough with an offseason trade to Los Angeles.

Occupying the other forward slot with Dandridge – for the second straight year – is Rudy Tomjanovich. Rudy T’s statistical output dipped somewhat from the previous year, but the Rockets performed better for the season finishing an even 41-41 and making the playoffs. The 41 wins were a franchise record at that point and Houston advanced to the second round of the Eastern Conference playoffs. In the postseason Tomjanovich played out of his mind averaging 23 points on 56% shooting. Remember this is a power forward who got a good deal of his points on mid-and-long range jump shots. So the accomplishment is all the more noteworthy.

For Rudy T to get Houston to the second round required dispatching the New York Knicks in the 1st Round. The early playoff exit was disappointing for New York, but Earl Monroe was the story for the Knicks that season. After being traded from Baltimore to New York in 1971, Monroe was used mostly as a reserve on a well-balanced attack. But as Dave DeBusschere, Willis Reed, Dick Barnett and Jerry Lucas retired, Monroe’s offensive output was needed more and more. In 1975, he once again received big time minutes and rose to the challenge. Earl the Pearl averaged 21 points as he began an oft-forgot career renaissance at age 30.

Pos. Player Team G PPG RPG APG BPG SPG FG% FT% WS PER
F Rudy Tomjanovich Houston Rockets 81 20.7 7.6 2.9 0.3 0.9 0.525 0.790 10.1 17.8
F Bob Dandridge Milwaukee Bucks 80 19.9 6.9 3.0 0.6 1.5 0.473 0.805 7.0 16.7
C Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Milwaukee Bucks 65 30.0 14.0 4.1 3.3 1.0 0.513 0.765 12.9 26.4
G Randy Smith Buffalo Braves 82 17.8 4.2 6.5 0.0 1.7 0.484 0.800 7.2 17.1
G Earl Monroe New York Knicks 78 20.9 4.2 3.5 0.4 1.4 0.457 0.827 6.6 17.7

The Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams: 1973-74 Season

Bob Lanier (L); Calvin Murphy and Rudy Tomjanovich (center); Bob Dandridge (upper R); Pete Maravich (bottom R)
Bob Lanier (L); Calvin Murphy and Rudy Tomjanovich (center); Bob Dandridge (upper R); Pete Maravich (bottom R)

Ed. Note: Prior to the 1988-89 season, the NBA only had All-NBA 1st and All-NBA 2nd Teams. To fill in that historical award gap, the crack Pro Hoops History committee of one has gone back and created the Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams.

The 1973 All-NBA 3rd Team was filled with comeback kids, but this year’s team is full of some of the NBA’s new wave of bright young stars: Bob Lanier, Calvin Murphy, Rudy Tomjanovich, Bob Dandridge, and Pete Maravich.

Now in his fourth season, Bob Lanier has already made a 3rd Team before (1972). This time around though his domination is more impressive than before. His scoring and rebounding averages dropped slightly, but Lanier’s assists rose to four per game and his defense was superb averaging 3.0 blocks per game this year – the first the NBA kept track of blocked shots. Bob’s effectiveness led Detroit to a 52-win season and a narrow defeat in seven games to the Chicago Bulls in the 2nd Round of the Western Conference playoffs. All things considered this was the most successful season for the Pistons between their Finals appearances in the mid-1950s and their rise as the Bad Boys in the late 1980s. And Lanier, literally and figuratively, was at the center of it all.

Another powerhouse team from the NBA’s Midwest Division along with the Pistons this year were the Milwaukee Bucks. The Bucks finished with 59 wins, the best of any team in 1974. Of course, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was the main reason for that, but by this point Oscar Robertson was roughed up and ready for retirement, so it was fifth-year man Bob Dandridge and Lucius Allen who truly ran as Kareem’s wing men this season. Unfortunately, Allen got snuffed out for 3rd Team consideration by a couple of super guards detailed below, but Dandridge’s 19 points per game and exquisite defensive pressure lock up a spot for him. Already champs from 1971, the Bucks and Dandridge narrowly missed out on a second title this year, losing to Boston in an epic seven-game series.

At the other forward spot with Dandridge is Rudy Tomjanovich. The Rockets power forward in his fourth NBA season put together his finest season: 24.5 PPG, 9 RPG, and 3 APG while shooting a blistering .536 FG% and .848 FT%. Although ranging around at forward, Rudy T brought a long-range shooting touch that tormented opponents. Nearly matching that offensive torching was Calvin Murphy, point guard for the Rockets. Murphy – also in his fourth NBA season – averaged 20.4 PPG and 7.4 APG while knocking down 52% of his shots and 87% of his free throws. All of this while standing just a mere 5’9″ tall. Although Houston finished with just 32 wins this year, the duo – and best of friends – are worthy selections for the All-NBA 3rd Team as they pushed Houston to a .500 record during the last half of the season and set the Rockets up for a huge push in the 1975 season.

Taking home the final spot is guard Pete Maravich for the Atlanta Hawks – who was ALSO in his fourth NBA season; that 1970 draft class was STRONG. Maravich torched the NBA for nearly 28 points a night. Of course, the amount of points with Pistol Pete was secondary to how he got the points. He dazzled crowds with his dribbling and contorting shots. Unfortunately for Maravich, the Hawks had run out of steam. His partnership with Lou Hudson – who also scored 25 PPG this year – failed to get Atlanta to the playoffs this year after a string of appearances. During the offseason, the Hawks traded their star guard to the expansion New Orleans Jazz for two players and FIVE draft picks – one of which eventually became Alex English and another David Thompson. Was Maravich worth that cost? Probably not. But he was definitely talented enough  in 1974 for New Orleans to ask that question and answer “yes”.

Pos. Player Team G PPG RPG APG BPG SPG FG% FT% WS PER
F Bob Dandridge Milwaukee Bucks 71 18.9 6.7 2.8 0.6 1.6 0.503 0.818 8.4 17.0
F Rudy Tomjanovich Houston Rockets 80 24.5 9.0 3.1 0.8 1.1 0.536 0.848 12.8 20.5
C Bob Lanier Detroit Pistons 81 22.5 13.3 4.2 3.0 1.4 0.504 0.797 14.4 23.9
G Pete Maravich Atlanta Hawks 76 27.7 4.9 5.2 0.2 1.5 0.457 0.826 7.6 20.3
G Calvin Murpy Houston Rockets 81 20.4 2.3 7.4 0.0 1.9 0.522 0.868 9.2 20.0

 

The Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams: 1972-73 Season

Dave DeBusschere (top L); Charlie Scott (bottom L); Nate Thurmond (center);  Lenny Wilkens (top R); Lou Hudson (bottom R)
Dave DeBusschere (top L); Charlie Scott (bottom L); Nate Thurmond (center); Lenny Wilkens (top R); Lou Hudson (bottom R)

Ed. Note: Prior to the 1988-89 season, the NBA only had All-NBA 1st and All-NBA 2nd Teams. To fill in that historical award gap, the crack Pro Hoops History committee of one has gone back and created the Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams.

The story of the 1972-73 All-NBA 3rd Team is one of comebacks. Nate Thurmond (1967), Dave DeBusschere (1965), and Lenny Wilkens (1965, ’67, ’68) have been chosen before for these 3rd teams, but it’s been quite awhile for each man. It’s no fault of their own, really. Either untimely injuries or super seasons from other stars have juuuust bounced them from selection many times.

Dave DeBusschere‘s presence at power forward on this squad is largely due to his unflappable presence with the New York Knicks front court. Although DeBusschere was 32-years-old, his running mates Willis Reed (30 years of age) and Jerry Lucas (also 32) were much worse for the wear than he was. Dave logged 37 minutes per game while missing just 5 games this season. Meanwhile Lucas and Reed hovered at 28 minutes a night and missed over 10 games each this season. Appropriately, DeBusschere led the Knicks in rebounding and was also second in points behind Walt Frazier. All while playing his usual high brand of defense. He was named to the All-Defensive 1st Team for the fifth-straight season, after all. DeBusschere kept up his superb play in the playoffs helping New York to its second title in four seasons.

Speaking of defense, the venerable Nate Thurmond was the mighty rock anchoring the most successful Golden State Warriors team since they made a run to the Finals in 1967. With the return of Rick Barry from the ABA, the Warriors reeled off 47 wins and upset the 60-win Milwaukee Bucks in the playoffs before bowing out to the Lakers in the Western Conference Finals. Thurmond averaged a mirror-image double-double of 17 points and 17 rebounds this year. Unfortunately for Nate, this would be his last truly great season. The 31-year-old defensive stalwart began to decline the next season and then fell off a cliff for the 1974-75 season. Nonetheless, he puts in a fine career and 1973 was a great last hurrah of stellar production from Thurmond.

Last in the trio of comeback artists is Lenny Wilkens. After three seasons in Seattle as player-coach, Wilkens was traded to the Cleveland Cavaliers for the 1973 season and relinquished the coaching duties. At 35-years-old, Wilkens put in fine work as a point guard for Cleveland averaging about 20 points and 8 assists per game. The Cavs, just in their 3rd season, were better off for Lenny’s presence reaching 32 wins after campaigns of 15-and-23 wins the previous two years. Still, the potent Wilkens, like Thurmond and DeBusschere, was nearing the end of his career. Sure enough, the next season he dipped a little like Thurmond and then fell off a cliff in 1975. By that time, Wilkens was back to being a player-coach with the Portland Trail Blazers. Soon enough he was full-time coaching and on his way to being one of the greatest coaches in basketball history.

Well, enough with the comebacks now it’s time for old faithful of the Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams, Lou Hudson. For the third-straight and final season, Hudson plays well enough to garner a forward spot on this here selection ceremony. At this point, there’s nothing left to say for Hudson that hasn’t been said already – well, nothing new except he averaged a career-high 27 points per game this season. And of course he was still donning an awesome mustache.

Getting to our last player, we have the first infusion of ABA blood into the All-NBA 3rd Team body. 24-year-old Charlie Scott played two seasons in the ABA averaging 30.6 PPG during his stint with the Virginia Squires. Moving to the NBA full-time in 1972-73, Scott didn’t seem at all bothered by the switch averaging 25 points, 6 assists and 4 rebounds a game for the Phoenix Suns. At 6’5″ tall, Scott could play either guard spot, but team success for the Suns was a tough get in this era whether Charlie was point or shooting guard. The old guard led by Connie Hawkins was fading fast. Great as he was this season, Scott could only muster 38 wins for the Suns. Perhaps most important, though, is that Scott proved that players who started in the ABA and transitioned to the NBA could still be stars despite the complaints and insults lobbed the ABA’s way. In a few year’s time, the red, white, and blue league will be filling these ranks with their alumni.

Position Player Team G PPG RPG APG FG% FT% WS PER
F Lou Hudson Atlanta Hawks 75 27.1 6.2 3.4 0.477 0.825 9.3 19.0
F Dave DeBusschere New York Knicks 77 16.3 10.2 3.4 0.435 0.746 6.6 16.0
C Nate Thurmond Golden State Warriors 79 17.1 17.1 3.5 0.446 0.718 9.9 17.3
G Lenny Wilkens Cleveland Cavaliers 75 20.5 4.6 8.4 0.449 0.828 9.5 19.3
G Charlie Scott Phoenix Suns 81 25.3 4.2 6.1 0.446 0.784 6.5 19.0

The Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams: 1971-72 Season

Jeff Mullins (top L); Lou Hudson (bottom L); Gail Goodrich (center); Chet Walker (top R); Bob Lanier (bottom R)
Jeff Mullins (top L); Lou Hudson (bottom L); Gail Goodrich (center); Chet Walker (top R); Bob Lanier (bottom R)

Ed. Note: Prior to the 1988-89 season, the NBA only had All-NBA 1st and All-NBA 2nd Teams. To fill in that historical award gap, the crack Pro Hoops History committee of one has gone back and created the Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams.

The All-NBA 3rd Team for 1972 features mostly old favorites plus one newcomer to the party.

Returning for the first time since 1969 is Chicago Bulls forward Chet Walker. Last we saw from Chet the Jet, he was tearing up the offensive end for the Philadelphia 76ers. Even though three years had passed, Walker was actually playing better than ever in this, his 10th NBA season, than he was in 1969. Considering his total scoring output plus his efficiency at producing points, this was Walker’s greatest scoring season. He mustered 22.0 points per game, a .583 TS% and a 21.8 PER. All of those numbers were career-highs. Walker’s herky-jerky offensive movements and gyrating shoulders created much contact and enabled him to take nearly 7.5 free throws a game. His grinding style suited the Bulls well as they won a then-franchise record of 57 wins and advanced to the Western Conference Finals.

Filling in at the other forward slot is the familiar Lou Hudson. Nothing much has changed for Sweet Lou, who again averaged about 25 points for the third straight season. Hudson’s marksmen accuracy on his jumpers was pretty much taken for granted at this point, but there this is something to be said for being a guaranteed, mundane 25 PPG scorer. Oh wait, there is one deviation for Hudson this season: he averaged a career-high 4.0 assists per game. There’s some diversification!

Moving over to guard, we have Gail Goodrich returning to the All-NBA 3rd Team. Rejoining the Los Angeles Lakers in 1971, Goodrich had a down season adjusting to playing alongside the likes of Wilt Chamberlain and Jerry West. In 1972, the trio clicked beautifully. West was on the All-NBA 1st Team. Wilt on the 2nd Team. And here we have Goodrich who averaged 26 points per game on .487 FG% and .850 FT%. Goodrich’s ability to play either guard position, shoot masterfully, handle the ball, work off of screens, or cut without the ball made him a dangerous player for defenses to handle. No wonder the Lakers trounced the league for 69 wins and the title this year.

Further up the California coast, Jeff Mullins also makes a return to the All-NBA 3rd Team on behalf of the Golden State Warriors. His last appearance, like Chet Walker, was in 1969 albeit for the San Francisco Warriors. Anyways, Mullins was the leading scorer on a well-balanced Warriors attack: Mullins with 21.5 PPG and Cazzie Russell and Nate Thurmond each averaging 21.4 PPG. Interestingly, Mullins, despite playing shooting guard, also led Golden State in assists with 5.9 dimes per game.

And now we have our new kid on the block: center Bob Lanier. In just his second NBA season, Lanier crushed opponents – usually figuratively, sometimes literally – with 25.7 PPG and 14.2 RPG. Despite winning just 26 games, the big man breathed new hope and life into a moribund Pistons franchise that had struggled to find success since moving from Fort Wayne to Detroit in 1957. Lanier’s toughness, lefty hook shots, jumpers, and defensive control of the paint paired well with guard Dave Bing. The duo promised better days for Detroit and this won’t be the last we see of Lanier on these squads.

Position Player Team G PPG RPG APG FG% FT% WS PER
F Lou Hudson Atlanta Hawks 77 24.7 5.0 4.0 0.503 0.812 9.7 18.3
F Chet Walker Chicago Bulls 78 22.0 6.1 2.3 0.505 0.847 14.5 21.8
C Bob Lanier Detroit Pistons 80 25.7 14.2 3.1 0.493 0.768 8.4 23.1
G Gail Goodrich Los Angeles Lakers 82 25.9 3.6 4.5 0.487 0.850 12.3 20.1
G Jeff Mullins Golden State Warriors 80 21.5 5.6 5.9 0.467 0.794 9.9 18.0

The Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams: 1970-71 Season

Jerry Lucas (top L); Lou Hudson (bottom L); Wilt Chamberlain (center); Jerry Sloan (top R); Norm Van Lier (bottom R)
Jerry Lucas (top L); Lou Hudson (bottom L); Wilt Chamberlain (center); Jerry Sloan (top R); Norm Van Lier (bottom R)

Ed. Note: Prior to the 1988-89 season, the NBA only had All-NBA 1st and All-NBA 2nd Teams. To fill in that historical award gap, the crack Pro Hoops History committee of one has gone back and created the Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams.

After suffering a devastating knee injury in the 1970 season, a 34-year-old Wilt Chamberlain triumphantly returned to form, nearly averaging a 20-20 in points and rebounds while also distributing just about 4.5 assists per game. The Lakers center helped shore up a team in transition. Elgin Baylor was pretty much done as an NBA player, missing all the season except two games. Gail Goodrich, after having been lost to Phoenix in 1968, returned to the Lakers. Jerry West was great as ever, but the Lakers mustered just 48 wins. Wilt’s spectacular recovery was a needed sign that the center spot was still fine in L.A. After a coaching change after the 1971, the Lakers indeed proved fine: winning 69 games overall, including 33 in a row, and the capturing the NBA title.

In the guard spots are two players forever linked as a fearsome tandem later in the 1970s, but here they make the All-NBA 3rd Team as opponents: Norm Van Lier and Jerry Sloan.

In just his second NBA season, Stormin’ Norman became the lead point guard in Cincinnati and produced a rich bounty. Averaging 16 points, a league-leading 10 assists and 7 rebounds a game, Van Lier was the brightest spot on an increasingly woebegone Royals franchise. After just one more season in Cincy, the Royals moved to Kansas City (and Omaha) to become the Kings. Before that 1973 move occurred, Van Lier was traded in 1972 to make room for Tiny Archibald as the team’s point guard. It was this trade that would make Norm the backcourt mate of Jerry Sloan in Chicago.

And Sloan had been around a decent amount of time in Chicago. Entering his fifth season with the Bulls, Sloan was already a two-time All-Star and a two-time member of the All-Defensive Team. He would add another All-Defense selection to his resume this season, but he also produced perhaps his finest offensive campaign of his career in 1971. Sloan averaged a career-high 18.3 PPG as well as a career-high 3.5 APG. The gritty Illinoisan’s work helped lift the Bulls (only around since 1966-67) to a then-franchise record of 51 regular season wins. In fact it was their first winning season at all. Adding Van Lier the next season would help propel Sloan and the Bulls to a string of highly successful seasons throughout the early 1970s.

At the power forward slot is an old-time favorite making a bounce back season: Jerry Lucas. The last we saw of Lucas in 1969, he was on his way out of Cincinnati as the Royals – as mentioned above – were sliding into awful mediocrity. Traded to the San Francisco Warriors early in the 1969-70 season, Lucas never quite got his footing that year. But here in ’71, the 30-year-old made a triumphant return, much like Wilt Chamberlain, with averages of 19 points, 16 rebounds and nearly 4 assists per game. All while shooting 49.8% from the field and 78.7% from the line. Teamed with Jeff Mullins and Nate Thurmond, Lucas formed a talented, yet forgotten triumvirate in Warriors history. However, the team was thin elsewhere and won just 41 games and getting pummeled by the 66-win Milwaukee Bucks in the playoffs. After that postseason defeat, Lucas was traded to the New York Knicks and helped them make the back-to-back Finals in 1972 and ’73, winning it all the latter season.

Lastly, we have Lou Hudson of the Atlanta Hawks. Super Lou was in his fifth season with the Hawks and would appear in his third-straight All-Star Game on the strength of averaging 26.8 PPG this year. That point production placed Hudson fifth amongst all NBA players that year, the second-straight season he had done so. Despite Hudson’s continued brilliance, and the addition of rookie Pete Maravich, the Hawks slipped to 36 wins this season after winning 48 the previous season. The loss of Joe Caldwell to the ABA proved to be a huge blow for the squad. Nonetheless, Hudson maintained his fine level of play and deserves the final spot on the 1971 All-NBA 3rd Team.

Position Player Team G PPG RPG APG FG% FT% WS PER
F Lou Hudson Atlanta Hawks 76 26.8 5.1 3.4 0.484 0.759 7.9 18.2
F Jerry Lucas San Francisco Warriors 80 19.2 15.8 3.7 0.498 0.787 10.5 20.6
C Wilt Chamberlain Los Angeles Lakers 82 20.7 18.2 4.3 0.545 0.538 12.6 20.3
G Norm Van Lier Cincinnati Royals 82 16.0 7.1 10.1 0.420 0.816 6.0 16.2
G Jerry Sloan Chicago Bulls 80 18.3 8.8 3.5 0.441 0.715 6.0 14.6

The Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams: 1969-70 Season

 

Gail Goodrich (top L); Bob Love (bottom L); Wes Unseld (center); Earl Monroe (top R); Bill Bridges (bottom R)
Gail Goodrich (top L); Bob Love (bottom L); Wes Unseld (center); Earl Monroe (top R); Bill Bridges (bottom R)

Ed. Note: Prior to the 1988-89 season, the NBA only had All-NBA 1st and All-NBA 2nd Teams. To fill in that historical award gap, the crack Pro Hoops History committee of one has gone back and created the Lost All-NBA 3rd Teams.

Sporting a 50-32 record, the Baltimore Bullets placed two members on the All-NBA 3rd Team this season: Earl Monroe and Wes Unseld. Both players had been Rookie of the Year (1968 for Earl; 1969 for Wes) and Unseld was even named MVP of the league the previous season. Alongside Gus Johnson – who was on the All-NBA 2nd Team this season – Baltimore was again a powerhouse in the East.

Monroe continued to be the team’s main offensive threat with his creative, circular dribbling and scoring. Unseld meanwhile maintained his place as  the team’s defensive anchor averaging nearly 17 rebounds a game while also chipping in a career-high 16 points per game. As for the postseason, Unseld and Monroe would see their Bullets eliminated by the New York Knicks, 4-games-to-3, in the Eastern Division Semi-Finals.

Occupying the other guard spot on this season’s 3rd Team with Monroe is Gail Goodrich. Goodrich had enjoyed a breakout season in 1969 with the Suns averaging 24 PPG. Although his scoring averaged dropped for the 1970 season, he was much more efficient at getting his baskets (.474 TS% in 1969 vs. a .535 TS% in 1970) and setting up his teammates (5.8 assists per 36 minutes in 1969 vs. 6.7 per 36 minutes in 1970).

At the forward slots we have Bob Love and the defensive bulldog, Bill Bridges. Bob Love, affectionately nicknamed “Butterbean” was a 28-year-old breakout star. But his story was even more remarkable than Goodrich’s. Love had been a bit player in the NBA and had also played in minor pro leagues before finally getting a chance of serious play this year with the Chicago Bulls. Love rewarded Chicago with averages of 21 points and 8.7 rebounds per game.

Meanwhile, the venerable Bill Bridges was in his eighth NBA season and playing better than ever despite it. His points (15 per game) and rebounds (14 per game) production were both near career-highs; his assists per game (4.2) was a career-high; as was his true shooting percentage (.538). Add to that his unquantifiable defensive presence and you can see why the Hawks were able to amass a 48-34 record and reach the Western Division Finals for the second straight season.

 

Position Player Team G PPG RPG APG FG% FT% WS PER
F Bill Bridges Atlanta Hawks 82 14.8 14.4 4.2 0.475 0.734 6.6 15.9
F Bob Love Chicago Bulls 82 21.0 8.7 1.8 0.466 0.842 8.6 16.1
C Wes Unseld Baltimore Bullets 82 16.2 16.7 3.5 0.518 0.638 11.1 17.8
G Earl Monroe Baltimore Bullets 82 23.4 3.1 4.9 0.446 0.830 8.3 17.3
G Gail Goodrich Phoenix Suns 81 20.0 4.2 7.5 0.454 0.808 6.7 16.3

Tim Hardaway

Born: September 1, 1966
Position: Point Guard
Professional Career:
Golden State Warriors (NBA): 1989-’96
Miami Heat (NBA): 1996-2001
Dallas Mavericks (NBA): 2001-’02
Denver Nuggets (NBA): 2002
Indiana Pacers (NBA): 2003

Tim Hardaway (Hoops Vibe)
Tim Hardaway (Hoops Vibe)

Yes! Yes!… YES! In your face!

That’s the kind of bravado that defined the career of Tim Hardaway. Hard as it is to believe, his game did speak louder than his words. The brash pinball whirled and barreled his way into a decade-long all-star sojourn in the NBA. The bravado and talent persevered despite a treacherous ACL tear that robbed him of his most brazen athleticism midway through his career.

Luckily for Hardaway and basketball fans, the least brazen of his  athleticism was still pretty brazen.

The 6’0″ (on a good day with thick socks on) guard was an electrifying sensation when he burst into the NBA with the Golden State Warriors in the 1989-90 season. Hardaway completed the fabled, but short-lived, triptych of Run-TMC with Mitch Richmond and Chris Mullin. Warriors coach Don Nelson drove those players to push the ball at insane speeds and to score at any given opportunity.

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